70s Country Artists The "twangcore" and "Americana" boom of today owes a large debt to the shaggy twangers and no-hit wonders of yesteryear -- this section looks at the hippiebilly and stoner bands and a few odd, random artists from the 1960s, '70s and early '80s, back before there was anything called "alt-country." This page covers the letter "N."







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Johnny Nace "The Fabulous Johnny Nace/Sometimes I Wonder" (Topic Records, 1969-?) (LP)
Born in Kansas City, singer-guitarist Johnny Nace (1934-1990) played old-school country music in a variety of bands dating back to the 1950s, with some of his earlier, more rugged material claimed retroactively by the rockabilly camp. He spent his entire career in Missouri, working as a deejay on stations such as KOKO, Warrensburg and KDRO, Sedalia, as well as hosting a TV show called "The Circle 6 Ranch." In addition to leading his own band, Nace was one of those hard-working locals who would back Nashville stars traveling through the Midwest, rubbing elbows with folks such as Buck Owens, Elvis Presley, Dottie West and Faron Young. He recorded a ton of singles on indie labels such as Rimrock, Topic and Starday's custom series, though I think this was his first full LP. Nace passed away in his hometown of Sedalia at age 56 from a heart attack; his sons Dave and Jimmy formed a band of their own, a roots-rock group called the Nace Brothers.


Johnny Nace "Music Nace And Country" (Topic Records, 1970-?) (LP)


Johnny Nace "Live" (Topic Records, 197--?) (LP)
This album spotlights Nace and his band The Midnighters playing a show at a place called Maxine's, back in 1977...


Johnny Nace "In The Country With Johnny Nace" (Nova Records, 19--?) (LP)


Johnny Nace "Love Songs" (Ethics Records, 1980-?) (LP)
(Produced by Jack Eubanks & Harold Shedd)


Lonnie Nance "Lov'en The Country" (Caprice Records) (LP)
(Produced by Roger LeBlanc)


Bill Nash "Bill Nash" (A. V. Mittelstedt Productions, 1980) (LP)
(Produced by A. V. Mittelstedt)

Before setting out as a solo artist, singer Bill Nash was part of the Nash Family Trio, a gospel group which recorded a pair of albums on Columbia in the early 'Sixties. He was later briefly signed to Mercury Records, and claims credit as the first person to record Kris Kristofferson's "For The Good Times." This more-indie album was a straight-up secular country album, with weepers and cheating songs, recorded at A. V. Mittelstedt's studio in Houston, Texas, with a locals-only Lone Star crew that included Randy Cornor on guitar. Included are tracks such as "Two Drinks From Forgettin'," "Ready To Take My Chances" and "You're The Most I Ever Was In Love." In later years, Nash enjoyed success as a Top Forty songwriters, penning hits and album tracks recorded by artists such as Eddy Arnold, Diamond Rio, Highway 101 and Reba McEntire, who took his song, "They Asked About You" into the Top Ten in 1994.


Buddy Nash "The Agony And The Ecstasy" (Two Breau's, 1978) (LP)
(Produced by K. C. Ramsey)

This isn't really a country album, though it is very "local" and does have one noteworthy twangtune on it, the perky country-rock novelty number, "Interstate 85," which features steel guitar picking from a guy named Glenn Childress. Mostly, though, the SF Bay Area's Buddy Nash seems to have been a straight-up lounge singer, '70s style, fusing pop vocals and disco with a curious undercurrent of rootsy twang... But really, I'd have to simply classify this as a lounge album, and leave it to experts in that field to assess the record on those terms. Nash called the Bay Area home, but he toured extensively and played lounge gigs throughout the South, and for a while he was a featured performer on a couple of Nashville radio and TV shows... The album mentions that he was a child performer and that his parents were show business professionals (though sadly the liner notes don't mention their names, and for the life of me I couldn't figure out who they were by searching online...) Anyway, Mr. Nash seems to have stuck around San Francisco, and became a vocal coach, community theater actor and music shop salesman, also playing cabaret shows from time to time... This seems to have been the only release on the Two Breau's record label, which was located in San Antonio, Texas, though I'm not sure if this was the only album Nash recorded.


Eddie Nash & Joy King "Live At Ghost Town, Maggie Valley NC" (Hill Country Records) (LP)
This record was an early 1970s souvenir of Ghost Mountain Park, in Maggie Valley, North Carolina. Eddie Nash played several instruments and also did country music impersonations; his father, "Panhandle Pete" was also a performer at the park. The repertoire was a mix of old-timey standards and contemporary country-pop hits like "Snowbird," "Never Ending Love" and Lynn Anderson's "Ride Ride Ride."


Eddie Nash & Joy King "By Request" (Galaxie III Studios, 197--?) (LP)
(Produced by Harry Deal)


The Nashville Bar Association "The Nashville Bar Association" (Chimer Records, 1977) (LP)
A cleverly-named pedal steel lovefest, featuring Music City heavyweights Jimmy Crawford, Buddy Emmons, Sonny Garrish, Russ Hicks, and John Hughey... If you like steel guitar, this is your record! (Many thanks to the folks at www.buddyemmons.com for their info on this album...!)


The Nashville Cats "Smash Hits Country Style" (Windmill Records, 1970) (LP)
I'm guessing this anonymous, budget-label studio crew was not the same group as the Cats listed below... but I woudn't swear on it... This group covered plenty of obvious '50s/'60s standards, stuff like "Release Me" and "He'll Have To Go" along with more contemporary 'politanesque songs such as "Gentle On My Mind" and Nobody's Child," as well as "A Boy Named Sue" and "Ruby, Don't Take Your Love To Town," all of which points to a 1969-70-ish release date. No idea who the pickers were on this one... but the label says it was recorded in Spectro-Dimension Stereo, so that's cool!


The Nashville Cats "Recorded Live" (Nashville Cat Productions) (LP)
This one's a real obscuro-mystery album... Apparently this was a group of guys trying to make it in Nashville, recorded during a live set at the Country Club, a joint that was owned by Nashville second-stringer Hugh X. Lewis. No idea who these guys were, or if they were related to the faux-band above.


The Nashville Country Jamboree "Nashville's First Country-Rock Group" (SPV-Yellow Label, 2011) (CD)
At some point, devoted country music cratediggers will come across some goofy-looking old LPs by the Nashville Country Jamboree, a group with a name and an image as nondescript and generic as the dozens of other Nashville "soundalike" bands of the 1960s and early '70s. The soundalikes were the product of the lower-rent end of the music industry, generally anonymous studio crews who banged out cover versions of hits of the day, which were then sold at cut-rate prices at truckstops and drug stores, particularly in rural areas where there were no record stores or five-and-dimes, and where faux hits were better than no hits at all. The thing about the Nashville Country Jamboree, though, was that the group actually recorded a fair amount of orighinal material, most of it written by Johnny Elgin -- one of the in-house bandleaders at the spunky indie Spar Records -- and his right-hand man, Jerry Foster, who went on to become a major hitmaker in the 1970s. These originals are gathered here, and while derivative of contemporary stars such as Buck Owens and Roger Miller, they're also pretty fun and definitely worth a whirl. The Jamboree band also featured some massive talent -- their singers included Elgin and Foster, as well as Bobby Russell and songwriter Marijohn Wilkin (best known for penning "The Long Black Veil" for Johnny Cash.) The pickers listed in this release are a Music City who's-who A-list, with basically every heavyweight studio player you can think of from the '70s, with the core group being the band that centered around Mac Gayden, Wayne Moss and Charlie McCoy, the group of superpickers who would later branch out into bands such as Area Code 615 and Barefoot Jerry. Sure, if you listen closely you'll hear flubs and perfunctory run-throughs on some of these songs -- no one expected any hits off of these albums -- but you cal also hear the confidence and competence of the backing bands. This CD release also includes excellent liner notes that go into unusually rich detail about the people who were chugging along on the underbelly of Nashville's massive music machine. It's a fun collection of quirky, twangy tunes, as well as an excellent document of a time when indie labels were still a vibrant part of the Nashville scene. Recommended!


The Nashville Country Jamboree "Greatest Country Hits Of The '60s" (Cormar International) (LP)


The Nashville Country Jamboree "20 #1 Country Hits" (Cormar International, 1972-?) (LP)


The Nashville Country Jamboree "The Saturday Night Sound Of..." (Spar Records) (LP)


The Nashville Country Jamboree "Country Hits By The Nashville Country Jamboree" (Spar Records) (LP)


The Nashville Country Jamboree "...Sings A Boy Named Sue And 11 Other C&W Hits" (Spar Records) (LP)


The Nashville Country Jamboree "Straight From Nashville" (Spar Records) (LP)
(Produced by Tommy Downs)


The Nashville Country Singers "Country And Western Hits, Volume XII" (Mountain Dew) (LP)
Lavish, baroque, occasionally bizarre cover versions of early '70s country hits, songs such as Freddie Hart's "Easy Loving," Charlie Pride's "Kiss An Angel Good Morning" and Dolly Parton's "Coat Of Many Colors," as well as a slew of less memorable minor works, such as "Only Love Can Break A Heart" (which was originally recorded by Sonny James) and Glen Campbell's "Oklahoma Morning." The recordings cycle through male, female and group vocals, and both pickers and singers tend to indulge themselves and overplay or oversing the material, a habit that can be fun sometimes, in a kitschy kinda way. I'm not sure if this was the Nashville Country Jamboree crew recording under a slightly different name, or yet another goofy fly-by-night prefab studio crew... At any rate, for those of us who actually do enjoy these cheapo-exploito album this one's a fine example of the genre.


The Nashville Cousins "Golden Country Hits: New Country Sounds" (Premier Records) (LP)
Another one of the many anonymous "bands" that recorded for the cheapo budget labels of the '60s and '70s... No info about who was in the group or when these tracks were recorded, though it does seem that the same material was recycled over the course of several LPs... Just a guess, but I think these are basically the same record, with different covers.


The Nashville Cousins "Harper Valley PTA/By The Time I Get To Phoenix" (Premier Records) (LP)


The Nashville Cousins "Country And Western Spectacular" (Premier Records) (LP)


The Nashville Sounds with Tom Grant "The Nashville Country Club Proudly Presents..." (Nashville Country Club) (LP)
Not to be confused with the smooth jazz pianist, singer Tom Grant was a Wisconsin native who led a house band in Milwaukee at a club called Nick's Nicabob, and later found a slot in an obscure Indiana-based venue called the Nashville Country Club. He eventually made it to Nashville, signing to Republic Records in 1979, where he landed two singles in the Billboard charts, though he may be better known as a member of the band Trinity Lane. Although his solo career didn't really take off, Grant stuck around and worked on several Nashville-based TV shows, including TNN's 'Eighties-era "Nashville Now" and "The Ralph Emery Show," on NBC. This album was recorded during his Indiana days, with a band called Nashville Sounds, which included Darrel Young on bass, Larry Young playing lead guitar, Billy Powell on steel, and Dale Greene thumping the drums. Apparently future star Steve Wariner also apprenticed in the band at some point, though I don't think he plays on this album.


Nashville Impact "Nashville Impact" (Smallville Records) (LP)
(Produced by Kevin McManus)

This band of struggling Nashville locals featured steel player Ron Crawley, singer Jill Crawley, Jerry Penrod on vocals and guitar, drummer Michael Cignarale (drums), and singer-bassist Michael Dukes (bass), as well as Marvin Steffens on keyboards, with Penrod and Dukes acting as the main songwriters. Additional studio crew included recording pros Terry McMillan and Doug Jernigan... They made at least two LPs, though I'm really not sure which came first. (When I find out, I'll let you know...)


Nashville Impact "Nashville Impact" (Fargo Records) (LP)
(Produced by Kevin McManus)

Wow! They made two albums... although honestly, I'm not sure which one came first. As on the other album, this has a lot of original material -- all original, actually -- though this time around there are no songs by Jerry Penrod, and four each by Michael Dukes, Jill Crawley and the new member, singer Patti Stephens.


The Nashville Now Band "From The Band To Our Fans" (Downs, 1985) (LP)
(Produced by Steve Schafer)

A truly dreadful album of bland, glossy Nashville pap -- I mean, pop -- from the house band of Ralph Emery's long-running Nashville Now TV program, which was on the air from 1983-93. There are a few usual suspect studio musicians in the band -- Hoot Hester, guitarist Fred Newell, steel player Larry Sasser... One of the backup singers is identified as Donna Rhodes, and I'm not sure if that's the same gal as was in the Rhodes Sisters duo. Otherwise, these are all pretty unknown artists, hopeful stars, I'm sure, but the music on here is just terrible and not worth knowing about unless you're a weirdo like me. 'Nuff said.


The Nashville Rhythm Section "Keep On Dancing (Country Style Swing), Volume One" (Silver Bear-Koala Records, 1981) (LP)
(Produced by Wes Sanborn & Bernie Vaughn)

A wildly cheesy set of country-disco exploitation tunes, mixing aggressively dated covers of late-'Seventies/early-'Eighties pop hits such as Dan Hartman's "Instant Replay," Kenny Loggins' "I'm Alright," "Celebration," "September," "Hot Stuff" and a particularly horrific and unnecessary version of "Reunited." Of note are the A-list Nashvillers on this album, with steel player Sonny Garrish and lead guitarist Greg Galbraith anchoring the sessions, along with Bruce Watkins on banjo and fiddle, and several uber-generic backup singers working in a distinctly disco-y mode. The arrangements are actually fascinating, lacking the robust sway of the line-dancing songs of later years, opting instead for a full embrace of the tinny disco beats that had already died in '78-'79... Despite coming late for the party, this record has had surprising durability, spawning several followup albums as well as being reissued on CD and downloads. Wow. Go figure.


The Nashville Silver Strings "The Silver Strings" (LP)


Nashville West "Nashville West" (Sierra Briar, 1978)
These loose, easygoing sessions were recorded on the fly in 1967 during the short, mayfly lifepsan of Nashville West, an early, influential country-rock combo that featured Gib Guilbeau on vocals, along with Clarence White on guitar, Gene Parsons playing drums, and Guilbeau's longtime friend Wayne Moore playing bass. The group broke up when White was tapped to join the Byrds, and their rehearsal tapes sat unused for over a decade until their release in '78.


Navasota "Rootin' " (ABC, 1972) (LP)
(Produced by Gary Kannon & Dennis Collins

There was, I suppose, some actual twang on this album, although these guys were pretty much a hard rock band in the early '70s mode -- hints of Southern rock, Creedence-style swamp boogie, and thuddier-sounding stuff in the style of -- I dunno -- Grand Funk Railroad or Spooky Tooth, though not without a hefty dose of Spinal Tap in the mix as well. These Texas boys -- who were originally from around Houston -- did dabble in country-rock on "Ballad Of A Young Man," which has good pedal steel but rather insincere vocals: haw! I'm singing like a hick!hyuck hyuck!! The steel guitar comes courtesy of Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, no less, who also plays on another of the album's twang tune, a coked-up version of "Ole Slew Foot." Probably the most noteworthy thing about this record is the presence of Donald Fagan and Michael Brecker, who were still paying their dues as studio musicians in the early days of Steely Dan, but they got a chance to do some horn and string arrangements, and I'm sure that came in handy later on... They contributed a song as well, the jittery-sounding "Canyon Ladies," which serves as a good lesson on how the Steely Dan guys could play their own material 'way better than, well, pretty much anyone else. Oh, and there's one more twangtune on here, the oddly-titled but pleasantly weird "P. Fahm," which qualifies as an early '70s oddity possibly worth resurrecting on a compilation album somewhere, sometime. Mostly, though, this album seems like a pretty formulaic, fairly sterile album. They try really hard, but I don't think they caught fire here. One final note: singer Dicky Sony, who does get a good soulful snarl going on several songs, later adopted the stage name King Cotton, and became a fairly well-known blues musician. So now ya know.


Carmen Neal "A Tribute To Patsy Cline" (Sutton) (LP)


Near Beer "Last Night -- What A Party We Had" (Cowboy Carl Records, 1978) (LP)
(Produced by Carl Schneider & Near Beer)

A live show held at the American Legion post 474, in Matteson, Illinois... This set is packed with outlaw classics from Waylon and Merle and the rest of the gang, including yet another cover of "Up Against The Wall, Redneck Mother" as part of a "redneck medley" that also includes "London Homesick Blues" and "Boney Fingers." The band also included a gal named Peggy Lynn Fargo, with lead vocals by Wade Rivers, who also wrote some originals for the band: "Longneck Kicker" and "I Like Country Music (With My Beer)." The set was poorly recorded, with pretty flat sound quality, but it's authentic as all getout -- some 1970's young folk getting on with their hard-country groove.


Nechako "Nechako" (Roost Records, 1979) (LP)
(Produced by Nechako & Willie MacAlder)

This four-song EP was, I think, the only release from this Canadian country-rock outfit... Pity, since they were a pretty solid band! Good stuff, though hard to find. Anyone know more about these guys? They were from Prince George, British Columbia, but that's all I know.


Ned "Ned" (Polydor, 1973) (CD)
(Produced by Bill Stewart)

Amiable longhair folk-rock, with a hint of country, and a dip into a longer, fusion-y jam session on the album's last track... I guess these happy-looking Bostonians fit into the "country-rock" category, mostly because of lead singer Nick Talantis' twangy vocals, but also because of the CSN&Y-derived mix of melodic guitar rock and hippie-twang. It's a pleasant record, though -- looking a few decades ahead, I'd say that folks who like Victoria Williams and Mark Olson's Creekdipper records might like this a lot. I also like the photo on the back cover where they're all holding big cuddly dogs who are licking their faces. Nothing says "hippie album" like big, cuddly dogs on the album art. Not sure if any of these guys stuck with music professionally, but this is a nice album for the times. (Also worth noting: Tommy Talton of the band Cowboy also sits in as a session guitarist on a few tunes.)


The Needham Twins & Gemini Express "Double Shot: Country - '50s" (Identical Productions, 1983) (LP)
(Produced by Kit Grove, Jerry Needham & Larry Needham)

Identical twin brothers Larry and Jerry Needham hailed from Cleveland, Ohio and got their start as a musical duo while serving a Vietnam War-era tour of duty in the armed forces. After their discharges, they moved to Nashville, where they worked throughout the '70s, then moved to Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, where they were living when they cut this kooky album. The repertoire is split between country (ranging from hillbilly oldies to newer stuff like "Bobbie Sue," "On The Road Again" and "I'm Gonna Hire A Wino To Decorate Our Home") and rock'n'roll oldies ("At The Hop," "Blueberry Hill," "Oh, Pretty Woman," "Big Girls Don't Cry," et.al.) On the back cover they have two pictures, one in their cowboy duds, the other in Sha-Na-Na muscle shirts, both brothers doing a bicep-flexing Bowzer pose. (Dunno if they ever did live shows where they switched costumes backstage, but that would have been kinda cool... ) Apparently, they travelled to Fargo, North Dakota to record this album, at Kit Grove's studio, Audio Media.


Bill Neely "Texas Law And Justice" (Arhoolie, 1974)
One of the most unusual-sounding albums in the Arhoolie catalog (and that's saying a lot!) This CD is an expanded version of a 1974 LP made by an obscure white Texas country/blues picker who plays a basically acoustic style, though amplified in a rather remarkable way. The overall effect is spooky and unnerving, which, as it turns out, is perfectly suited to the intense, unsettling nature of the songs themselves. Neely, a lifelong devotee of the legendary Depression-era country pioneer, Jimmie Rodgers, dwells in the darker areas of the country blues tradition, with stream-of-consciousness tunes about jail time and street crimes. Particularly striking are the preachy-but-raw religious tune "Satan's Burning Hell" and the previously unreleased "Skid Row," which detailed the seaminess of life in the lower rungs of big city life. I thought this album was particularly compelling, and certainly worth checking out. Just the kind of record that only Arhoolie could put out.


Bill Neely "Austin's Original Singer-Songwriter" (Lost Art, 2002)


Leonard Neely "Sings The Sacred Songs Of Hank Williams" (Cardinal Records, 1979) (LP)
Singer-picker Leonard Neely grew up in Spottsville, Kentucky and was working as a pastor in an Indianapolis church when he recorded this album, sometime in the mid-to-late 1970s, from the looks of it. This is a stripped-down acoustic tribute to the religious side of country legend Hank Williams, and as many fans will already know, ol' Hank certainly wrote some great gospel songs.



Sam Neely - see artist discography


Carla Neet & Jerry Blanton "Our Way" (Axbar, 1985) (LP)
(Produced by Joe Scates)

Yeesh. Well, it is indie... and it was under the radar... and I guess technically it was country... But this sure ain't my kinda twang. An uneven set of would-be Top Forty type stuff with tinkly keyboards, airy synths and generally bland musical backing, draped around the mismatched duo vocals of Blanton and Neet. And they are definitely mismatched: she overshadows him, in part because he's kind of a weak singer, and partly because she's a total showboater, sounding Cher-like at times, emoting powerfully whenever possible. It's possible that with more thoughtful production and more attention paid to "fixing" things in the studio this could have been a stronger record, though I suppose it's fine for what it is: '80s commercial country ballads done on a shoestring budget. Blanton is notable here as a songwriter, writing or co-writing over half the songs on the album, with Neet credited on two. Again, it's not my kinda country, but if I frame him as a Don Williams-y guy, I can see where he was coming from... and Blanton's originals are definitely better than the cover of "Wind Beneath My Wings" that closes out Side One of the record. Brr-r-r-rrr. No info on the backing musicians, though the liner notes claim that some Nashville pros were involved. The Axbar label was from San Antonio, Texas, although Neet later moved to Tennessee; her recording of "Here We Are Waltzing Again" (from this album) was also featured on a compilation of women artists who recorded for the Axbar label.


Steven Neil "The Rising Star" (Mariner Records, 1982) (LP)
(Produced by Dave Hieronymous, Dave Shipley & Fred Vail)

Fiddler Steven Neil wrote several original songs for this album, which also includes some Hank Williams, one by Chuck McCabe, one by Mentor Williams, and a version of Randy Newman's "Louisiana, 1927." This set was recorded in Nashville, with Neil singing and playing fiddle, backed by several different keyboardists (including Ron Oates and Tony Migliore), Bruce Dees on dobro, and Terry McMilllan playing harmonica.


Bonnie Nelson "Meet Bonnie Nelson: International Truck's Sweetheart Rose" (Squire, 1976) (LP)
(Produced by Kelso Herston)

A local performer from Colorado Springs, Ms. Nelson worked steadily through a procession of smalltime gigs in Colorado and Nevada, methodically building a regional fan base and work resume that is minutely (and charmingly) detailed in the liner notes. In 1972 Nelson won a contest sponsored by radio station KPIK, and was signed to a five-year deal offered by producer Kelso Herston, who more or less took over her career. She went to Nashville to cut a few singles for United Artists in 1973-74, and later recorded this album, with some studio pros backing her up on a set heavily populated with covers of hits from "lady" country stars. There are a couple of Patsy Cline classics, "Top Of The World," stuff like that, along with a few new tunes. Oddly enough, nothing she did made a dent on the charts... not until over a decade later, when she cracked into the Back Forty with a couple of singles in the late 1980s. (Thanks to Kim Sloan's blog for helping piece this info together...)


Bonnie Nelson "Good Nights Make Good Mornings" (Hop-A-Long, 1977) (LP)
(Produced by Travis Turk & Kelso Herston)


Bonnie Nelson "Live At The Country Palace" (Hop-A-Long, 1977) (LP)
(Produced by Travis Turk & Kent Hopper)

A concert show with some tracks spotlighting Speedy Haworth and his band, Stateside Express, as well as Bob Britton, and even Terry McMillan in there, playing the harmonica. This was recorded at The Country Palace nightclub, in Littleton, Colorado ... It's mostly a predictable set of cover tunes, though one standout is "Love From A Woman's Point Of View."


Bonnie Nelson "Meet Bonnie Nelson" (Door Knob, 1987) (LP)


Cliff Nelson "Oh Baby" (Sunbird Records) (LP)
(Produced by Rick Miller)

This one belongs strictly in the "Warning, Will Robinson!" column... Although the Tennessee-based Sundance label did record some country stuff, and though this fella Cliff Nelson did croon a couple of tunes that were technically considered country at the time ("Annie's Song," "Me And Bobby McGee") his focus was mainly straight-up cheesy pop-lounge schmaltz -- Billy Joel's "Just The Way You Are," Barry Manilow's "Copacabana," a goofy version of "On Broadway." I seriously doubt that Nelson -- apparently an Englishman backed by a six-piece band of Filipino musicians -- was an actual working lounge singer, and I'm fairly certain this album was strictly a vanity disc. Though I'm sure he had fun recording it, you can skip this one, really, particularly if you're a twangfan. (Although connoisseurs of loungecore kitsch might get a giggle out of it....) But country? No, not so much. Includes two original songs, Nelson's own "Reflections" and "Oh Baby."


Gwinn Nelson "Sings About El Paso" (El Paso/Food For The Ears, 1981) (LP)



Rick Nelson - see artist discography


Tommy Nelson "Cookin' Country" (Regard Records, 1975) (LP)
(Produced by Tim R. Nelson & Tom Russell)

Oklahoman Tommy Nelson is best known for his 1960 rockabilly song, "Hobo Bop," though he definitely had a country edge on this mid-'70s LP, recorded for a label out of Tulsa.



Willie Nelson -- see artist profile



Tracy Nelson - see artist discography



Michael Nesmith - see artist discography


The Nestor Haven Band "One Lane Bridge" (Icarus, 1983) (LP)
A country-folk band from Colorado Springs, Colorado, with some banjo and steel guitar... They released two albums, although I haven't been able to track down info on the other one yet.


Rick Neufeld "Hiway Child" (Alshire, 1971) (LP)


Rick Neufeld "Prairie Dog" (RCA-Canada, 1974) (LP)
(Produced by Rick Neufeld)

A spacy country-rock offering from a Canadian folkie whose career included hosting a music show on CBC-TV, and recording these three few albums. This one doesn't do much for me, though it has its moments. The opening track, "Country Pride," is a nice back-to-nature hippie anthem, but when the rock'n'roll vibe takes over, as on the too-cosmic "Falling And Breaking," it gets pretty iffy. Backing him on this album are several members of the Canadian Top 40 rock band, The Guess Who, playing in a very mellow mood. Worth checking out if you're on a seventies cosmic-cowboy kick, or are more into folkie meanderings than me... It's a gentle record, and might grow on you after a while.


Rick Neufeld "Manitoba Songs" (1978) (LP)


Bob Neuwirth "Bob Neuwirth" (Asylum Records, 1974) (CD & MP3)
(Produced by Antonino Reale)

A folk-rock Zelig, songwriter Bob Neuwirth spent a big chunk of the '60s hanging out with luminaries such as Joan Baez and Bob Dylan, and later with Janis Joplin and her crew. This country-rock solo album, which was recorded before he joined Dylan's Rolling Thunder tour, is liberally packed with high-powered musicians -- ranging from stars such as Rita Coolidge, Cass Elliot, Don Everly, Kris Kristofferson and Dusty Springfield to rootsier supporting players -- John Beland, Stephen Bruton, Richie Furay, Chris Hillman, Ben Keith, Thomas Jefferson Kaye, et. al. Most of the songs were written by Neuwirth, with a few additional tunes like Don Gibson's "Legend In My Own Time" as well as tunes by Donnie Fritts and Bobby Charles, showing his connections to Southern soul and the Muscle Shoals scene. A lot of roots-rock firepower for one little album! Just for good measure, Neuwirth closes the album out with a version of "Mercedez Benz," that timeless ditty he co-wrote with Janis Joplin...


The Nevadans "Virginia City's Bonanza Presents The Nevadans" (Tab Records) (LP)
Alas, neither of the guys in the duo called "The Nevadans" was actually from Nevada... Merle Bartlett and George La Ferry were from Arkansas and Sacramento, California (respectively) and the Tab label was, oddly enough, based in San Jose. Nonetheless, the Bonanza nightclub sponsored their lounge-act souvenir album, which is packed with honky-tonk cover songs and oldies... Not sure of the year on this one; late '60s/early '70s perhaps?


Pete Nevin "Pete Nevin" (LPN Records) (LP)
(Produced by Kerry Marx)

This off-the-radar indie set was recorded in Garland, Texas and has some true twang in it, but has perhaps more of a folkie tilt, in that Nevin explores personal, confessional themes and drifts into some rambling lyrics. He has a great, rural voice and the songs that are straight-up country are the best... There are also several songs on here that are a little too personal -- a trio of breakup songs that doubtless reflect his own upset, but don't translate that well for the rest of us -- as well as a few rock tunes and pop ballads that are musically pretty dreadful. On the plus side, this disc is packed not just with original material but also with locals musicians, none of whose names I recognize, which I personally find fun. Ultimately, this is one of those self-released records that are just too inwardly-directed and lack the universal touch: his that-chick-is-crazy songs are kind of embarassing, though I guess most of us have been there a time or two ourselves, right? Nevin later moved to Nevada and became a real estate broker specializing in selling ranches and other rural spreads, and played music on the side, though as far as I know this was his only record.



Mickey Newbury -- see artist profile


Gene Newby & The Round Mountain Boys "...Play Mountain Music" (Go Records) (LP)
This bluegrass-y band was affiliated with the Texas-based Grapevine Opry... Fiddler Gene Newby hailed from Fanshawe, Oklahoma, although most of the other guys in the band were from Arkansas. This album includes one original by Newby, "Round Mountain," along with a bunch of cover tunes. An accomplished musician, Newby also went into politics, serving as a Democratic member of the Oklahoma legislature; he passed away in 1990 at age fifty while campaigning for a seat on the state Senate. I'm not sure if he's the same Gene Newby who is described in Steve Burton's (rather bitchy) book Back Home, re: membership in and conflict over the San Jose country bar-band, Touch Of Texas... Anybody know for sure?


Gene Newby & The Round Mountain Boys "Live On Stage" (Go Records) (LP)
Bandleader Gene Newby wrote some original material, such as his songs "Old Red" and "Oklahoma," along with covers of tunes such as "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" and "Fire On The Mountain."


Gene Newby & The Round Mountain Boys "Sunday On Round Mountain" (Go Records-??) (LP)


Jim Newcomb & Larry Terherst "Country Gospel" (Calvary Records) (LP)
An absolutely delightful, unusually rambunctious religious album, recorded sometime in the 1960s by the duo of mandolin player/lead singer Jim Newcomb and rhythm player/harmonist Larry Terherst, who were fellow church members at a congregation in Concord, California. Newcomb is the star, but the whole band was totally rocking: they blend Southern gospel sentiments with bouncy Buck Owens-y West Coast honkytonk and raw, undisciplined bluegrass, with a ragged fiddle (played by Jim LaRoque) playing off an equally energetic steel guitar (Daymour Moses), with Newcomb's mandolin comming coming in for resonant, Jesse McReynolds-style leads. There's a pleasant amateurishness to the project, but also a ton of energy and enthusiasm... This is an album by true believers, sure, but it's also a lot of fun, and certainly accessible to more secular-minded twangfans. A gem.


The New Country Store "Lonestar Fever" (Hilltop Records) (LP)
(Produced by New Country Store, Kevin McManus & Tom Harasmisz)

A pretty strong set from a young band out of Orlando, Florida... Eight of the ten songs were written by singer Eddy West, with two more credited to a "B. Nelson," who wasn't in the band. It's all good stuff, ranging from a number of mellow-tempoed, John Denver-esque ballads to the jovial stoner song, "Stems And Seeds," which has a Buck Owens-meets-the-Statler Brothers feel (and namechecks Jerry Jeff Walker, John Prine and David Allan Coe!) Throughout are several solid country numbers, neither stomping honkytonk or wimpy countrypolitan, but a strong mix of styles. What's most evident about this album was they were serious about the music, and fine craftsmen -- maybe they didn't stand a chance commerically, but they made a damn fine album. The album was partly recorded in Nashville, partly in Orlando, with Johnny Gimble, Jack Blanchard and MIsty Morgan pitching in on the Nashville sessions. Not sure when this came out - late '70s or early '80s, I'm guessing.


New Deal String Band "Blue Grass" (London-Sire, 1970) (LP)
This was apparently a different crew than Tom Paley's '60s band of the same name... These guys, who hailed from North Carolina, are credited as the "first" hippie-longhair bluegrass band -- which I seriously doubt, but I suppose it's all about how you define things. Anyway, they made a big impression on the early 1970s festival scene, reportedly inspiring Sam Bush to create a style called newgrass that fused mountain music with countercultural sensibilities, while folks in the old guard, like Bill Monroe, are said to have hated them. I have to say, Monroe may have had it right on this one. Although I can see what they were aiming for, the musical end of this particular album doesn't do much for me: there's plenty of energetic, enthusuastic playing, but it's undisciplined and a little scattershot, and I really don't care for lead singer Leroy Savage's vocals. There's also a vague sense of them not really taking the music seriously, or at least being a little too loosey-goosey with it... This is borne out by the half-praise/half-mockery of the liner notes which proclaim that "underneath their long haired, unwashed exteriors there beats the hearts of six redneck farmers." (Admittedly, they might not have had much to do with the writing of the liners, but the comments do underscore an undercurrent of condescension that creeps into the recordings...) Historically, though, this is noteworthy for several grassed-up covers of classic rock songs, including the Rolling Stones' "No Expectations," a Dylan song, and the country-ish "Don't Pass Me By," by the Beatles, which was kind of novel at the time.


New Moon Swing Band "Sunny Side Of The Street" (Redbud, 1980) (LP)
(Produced by Richard Fish & The New Moon Swing Band)

An acoustic string-swing band with three-part vocal harmonies, violin, bass and guitars... This album -- which I think was their only LP -- was recorded in the bands stomping grounds of Bloomington, Indiana.


The New Prairie Ramblers "The New Prairie Ramblers" (1980) (LP)
(Produced by Peter Ostroushko & Steve Weiss)



New Riders Of The Purple Sage - see artist discography


New River Train "New River Train" (Oglala Records, 1979) (LP)
(Produced by Larry D. Zierath & Wes Homner)

Freshly-minted bluegrass twang from a South Dakota/Iowa band, recorded over a period of years between 1976 and '79...


Joe Newell "Local Boys First" (Jack The Bear Records, 1983) (LP)
(Produced by Joe Newell & Karen Hing)

Independent twang from Arvada, Colorado...All but one of the songs were written by Joe Newell, with one, "Daddy's Farm," composed by his guitar player, Michael Frazier.


The Nichols "The Nichols" (Rome Records, 198--?) (LP)
A family band from Columbus, Ohio with commercial, Top 40 aspirations... Guitarist Jimmy Nichols moved to Nashville and became an in-demand session player, backing Faith Hill and Mindy McCready, and was the tour bandleader for Reba McEntire. Not sure what year this album came out - early '80s sometime, from the looks of it... Most of the songs are originals, written by Jim Ginnetti and Tony Ginnetti.


Joe Paul Nichols "These Old Eyes Have Seen It All" (Custom Records, 1989) (LP)
(Produced by Johnny Hawkins, Bill Foshee & David Mitchell)

Country veteran Joe Paul Nichols was apparently a longtime member of the Hank Thompson band, though he recorded several indie albums of his own... This disc was recorded in Tyler, Texas with Lone Star stalwarts Tommy Morrell on steel guitar and Marc Jaco on bass... It's mostly country standards, but there are also a couple of new tunes written by Chuck Cusimano.


Harry C. Nickelson "Am I Losing You" (American Sound Records, 197--?) (LP)
As far as I can tell, Mr. Nickelson was from Illinois; newspaper listings have him playing shows in Marengo, IL, circa 1981. Other than that, I haven't been able to fing out much about this guy...


Art Nicklaus & The Country Nicks "No Regrets" (Greatheart Records, 1977-?) (LP)



Chris Nielsen - see artist discography


Sean Nielsen "For Once In My Life" (Adonda) (LP)
(Produced by Harrison Tyner)

Alabama native Sherrill "Shaun" Nielsen (1942-2010) sang in several well-known Southern gospel bands, notably with the Speer Family, The Statesmen and Jake Hess's Imperial Gospel Quartet... When Nielsen turned towards secular music, pop superstar Elvis Presley -- a longtime fan of Nielsen's religious singing -- brought him to Las Vegas and invited him to become part of his road show. This country-oriented album, which was recorded in Nashville, came out while Presely was still alive, so even though there's no release date, it's got to be pre-1977. (His name seems to be misspelled on the album jacket -- elsewhere, it's spelled "Shaun".) This album includes secular material, including covers of pop-vocals hits such as "Killing Me Softly," and "You've Lost That Loving Feeling."


Shaun Nielsen "The Songs I Sang For Elvis" (Adonda, 1980) (LP)


The Nite Capps "The Nite Capps" (American Heritage Music Corporation, 197-?) (LP)
(Produced by Gene Capps & Dean Narramore)

A family band from Idaho, led by patriarch Gene Capps, along with his wife Darlene and daughters Carla and Darla... In his liner notes Mr. Capps explains that actually the band's history stretched back to the Depression, when his parents toured around the Southwest and in California as the Capps Family. He joined the band as a kid in 1940(!) was was still plugging away when this record was made more than three decades later, and didn't retire the band until 1999. Most of the tunes are country standards, many from the bygone era of the 1940s, although there are covers of a couple of more contemporary hits, such as Mac Davis' "I Believe In Music" and Tanya Tucker's "Delta Dawn." Gene capps claims arranger credits on many of the oldies, although there is one original song on here, Darla Capps' "Lonely." Not sure when this LP was released, but it was either late, late '70s or early, early '80s -- sideman Bobby Allen joined the band in 1978.



Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - see artist discography


Chip Nix "Seventh Story" (Triple Tree Records, 1981) (LP)
(Produced by Vickie Lancaster)

This one was disappointing... Sure looks like it would be twangy, but it ain't. More of a muddled folk-eclectic kinda thing, not really my bag. Country fans, consider yourselves warned.


Johnny Noles & The Pretenders "Front Row Seat" (Hillside Records, 197--?) (LP)
(Produced by Jack Linneman & Gene Lawson)

A covers band from Fort Myers, Florida... Not sure of the date, but it definitely looks 1970s... anywhere from 1973-76, I'd guess.


Norfolk Southern Lawmen "Ride The Train" (Forest Records, 1985) (LP)
(Produced by Otis Forest)

A North Carolina bluegrass/old-timey band with an all-cop membership, playing a mix of bluegrass standards ("Rocky Top," "Foggy Mountain Breakdown") and older, pre-bluegrass stuff such as "Wreck Of The Old 97" and "Life Is Like A Mountain Railway." The train-related songs are appropriate since all the bandmembers (except the bass player) worked for the Southern Railway Police Department, either in Ashville, North Carolina, or nearby Hickory and Piedmont, NC. Apparently they they made quite a few albums, and went through a few permutations on the bandname, eventually settling on calling themselves "The Lawmen," although they shouldn't be confused with the Denver, Colorado band of the same name. A couple of these guys were older, having already retired from railroad work by the time they made this album.


North "Live" (Jaspir Records, 1978) (LP)
(Produced by Rick Trusty)

This Texas lounge band's lone album features both male and female vocals, and has been a longtime ironic favorite of kitsch devotees, with some describing it as "Caucasian funk," though that tagline may be a little too optimistic regarding the level of musical vigor involved. Anyway, they do play some country stuff -- yet another bar-band version of "Up Against The Wall Redneck Mother," along with "Blue Bayou," which was a hit for Linda Ronstadt around this time. But they also cover "Brickhouse," "Send In The Clowns" and "You Light Up My Life." So, they were very, um, of their times, as the saying goes. In 1976, North also released a single version of "Misty," so maybe they weren't as hardcore and funky as you might have imagined. But still, oh the delicious badness of it all!


North Country "North Country" (NC Records, 1972-?) (LP)
These fellas were apparently from western Canada, with lead singer Cal Tiendeau (or Riendeau?) looking like he was in his early thirties, while the other two bandmembers, guitarist Bryan Ferguson and banjo picker Tom Rolston, look like they were about 16, though maybe they were in their early twenties. They covered country and pop classics such as "Country Roads," "Teach Your Children," "He Ain't Heavy" and "You've Got A Friend," as well as chestnuts like "Rocky Top."


North Country Band "North Country Band" (NCB Records, 1978) (LP)


The North Star Band "Tonight: The North Star Band" (Adelphi, 1979) (LP)
(Produced by Chuck Chellman & Bob Dawson)

The first album from this Maryland-based alt-country group, a band that really typified the "hippie country" sound of the era... They had a pretty big, accomplished sound, too. The "hit" on this one (at least from my days as a hardcore KFAT listener...) was the great singalong anthem, "Redneck Hippie," along with its companion piece, "Country Boy," about the collision of country and rock in longhaired culture. They dip into a little western swing and sing one Conway Twitty cover, although the rest of the record is all original material. Unfortunately they also sang a lot of ballads, and these slower songs don't hold up well, since none of the guys in the band really had the vocal chops to pull it off. The uptempo songs are fun, though, and the band's musicianship is uniformly solid, particularly pedal steel player Jay Jessup, who adds sweet licks throughout. One of the better records of the era, even if only a tune or two really hold up over time.


North Star Band "Live At Eskimo Nell's" (Eskimo Brand Records, 1981) (LP)
(Produced by The North Star Band & Mark Greenhouse)


Marie Norway "Marie Norway" (Foxfire Records, 1976) (LP)
(Produced by Jerry Fox & Peter Troisi)

Originally from Massachusetts, singer Marie Norway cut this album with the help of several Boston-area and regional bands, including members of Wheatstraw, The Mission Band, Them Fargo Brothers, and The Estes Boys. She also played clubs like the Hillbilly Ranch and toured throughout New England with various pickup bands. This album is mostly packed with cover songs, though she also plays several locally crafted songs, including "For A Song" which was co-written by producer Jerry Fox, and "Calvin Cole," written by Allen Estes, as well as her own "Green Eyed Monster." Eventually, Norway made a go of it in Nashville, moving there a couple of years after cutting this album. She stayed there, plugging away for years doing commercial work for TV and jingles, as well as some songwriting and whatnot... After returning to New England, she briefly hosted a local country music TV show up in Norfolk, MA, after which she left show business and moved, decisively, to North Carolina. Decades later she digitized her recordings and reissued this album (with some bonus materials) on the CD/MP3 collection below. Norway also wrote a show business memoir called "It Started With A Dare," which talks about her career in the 1970s and '80s.


Marie Norway "Country Dreams: Marie Norway's Greatest Hits" (Third Rock Records, 2007) (MP3)
Originally out on CD, this album mostly gathers tracks off of her self-titled 'Seventies LP, along with some stuff from her later singles...


Toy Norwood "Live! At Village Creek State Park, Arkansas" (1981) (LP)
This album was more of an old-timey folkloric/outsider art kind of thing... Ms. Norwood was an older resident of Parkin, Arkansas who played folk music at the Village Creek State Park, on the state's Eastern border. She's backed here by two younger guys, songwriter Bill Haymes (who lived in Little Rock) and Terry Mitchell, who was from nearby Memphis.



Gary P. Nunn - see artist discography


Stu Nunnery "Stu Nunnery" (Evolution Records, 1973) (LP)
(Produced by Al Gorgioni)

This is one of those odd, eclectic, missing-gem albums of the 'Seventies, more of a soft-pop/experimental album than a country thing, though there's some plausible crossover into countrypolitan and singer-songwriter territory that makes this of interest to a certain slice of twangfans... Plus, bluegrass/twang pickers Eric Weissberg and Ken Kosek were in the studio band, so that may turn a few ears towards this album as well. Orignally from Massachusetts, Nunnery was a quintessential folk-rock mystery man, releasing this lone album in the waning glow of the hippie era, then fading from sight after it failed to make a dent in the American charts. Admittedly, it may have been a hard sell: mixing willowy, folk-freak mysticism with rootsy Leon Russell-esque boogie tunes and lavish soft-rock, along with hints of contemporary auteurs such as James Taylor and Harry Nilsson... Nunnery was a singular performer, though, not quite as arresting as, say, Nick Drake, but similarly drifting beyond the edges of mainstream pop. The record got some buzz abroad, in Europe and in Brazil (of all places!) and after the independent Evolution label folded, he earned a contract with Columbia's Epic label, though he was dropped around 1977 and later went into jingle writing, where he was quite successful. In the early '80s, Nunnery lost half his hearing and had to retire from music when it became too difficult for him to stay in key... At some point he retained control of his music, and reissued this album on CD, so it's much easier to find now. Definitely worth a spin!


Mayf Nutter "First Batch" (Capitol, 1973) (LP)
(Produced by Mayf Nutter)

Perhaps the weirdest thing about Mayf Nutter is that Mayf Nutter really is his name -- Mayfred Nutter Adamson, actually -- though his odd career trajectories are noteworthy as well. Born in West Virginia, Nutter started out as a rocker, playing lead guitar in Del Shannon's band, then hopped onto the folk bandwagon in the '60s, as part of the New Christy Minstrels, and finally into country, with a little help from Buck Owens Enterprises, which kind of had the run of Capitol Records in the early '70s. His first album has a slightly manic, try-anything-and-see-what-sticks feel to it, and with the exception of a few singles which were semi-hits in the Back Forty, nothing much came of it. There are some mildly desperate novelty songs, such as "The Litterbug Song" and "The Sing-Along Song," as well as his cover of Delaney Bramblett's pop smash, "Never Ending Song Of Love," which peaked at #57 on the Country charts. Mayf's real bread and butter came as an actor, with a string of minor roles on shows such as Gunsmoke, Charlie's Angels, and The Waltons. This album's kind of perky, but also strangely bland -- an example of an indie-ish oddball cutting an album for a major label, perhaps?


Mayf Nutter "Goin' Skinny Dippin' " (GNP Crescendo, 1976)






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